Category Archives: Bruce Terrrell NOAA

Roman Coins and Mystery wrecks

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Nummus showing The Goddess Helena. Obverse. view of one of the Seaton Down coins. Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum.

It is not often you get to hear from one of the world’s leading authorities on Roman Coins. In the new episode of the Archaeology Hour, Vincent Drost, Roman coin expert at England’s British Museum, speaks to us about 22,000 coins found at Seaton Down in the recent past. The coins gives us insight into the Roman monetary system and its empire-wide mints. We also discuss why so many such coin hoards were buried and never recovered.

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One of the Seaton Down coins was the millionth object cataloged by the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Image: Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum

More images of the Seaton Down coins can be found at:

http://wp.me/P5zmjV-1i

Next Christine Madigan (voted best Brit accent) gives us an overview of the current exhibit at the British Museum on The Celts. Working with the national Museum of Scotland and sources on the Continent, they have brought together some of the most remarkable finds over the years – magnificent pieces of jewelry and armor decorative in the distinctive Celtish style.

The British Museum - great shot from ThinkingBob.co.uk
The British Museum – great shot from ThinkingBob.co.uk
Images from the Gundestup Cauldron showing Cernnunos: Images: ww.britishmuseum.org
Images from the Gundestup Cauldron showing Cernnunos: Images: ww.britishmuseum.org
Spectacular brooch, typical of Celt goldsmithing. Image: ww.britishmuseum.org
Spectacular brooch, typical of Celt goldsmithing. Image: ww.britishmuseum.org
The horned 'Wandsworth' helmet. Image:ww.britishmuseum.org
The horned ‘Waterloo’ helmet found in 1860. Image: http://www.britishmuseum.org
Celt shield found at Wandsworth in London. Image: British Museum
Celt shield found at Wandsworth in London. Image: British Museum.

Finally NOAA archaeologist Bruce Terrell discusses a mysterious wreck found in six thousand fathoms off the coast of North Carolina. Far out on the Blake Plateau the little craft may be a coasting schooner blown far off course – or perhaps a rare Bermuda Sloop. Coasting schooners are represented by the vessel found at Brown’s Ferry in the Black River near Georgetown SC.

Conserved remains of the Brown's Ferry Coasting Schooner. Photo: www.sciway.net
Conserved remains of the Brown’s Ferry Coasting Schooner. Photo: http://www.sciway.net

Excavated by Alan Albright and later worked on by the author, the wreck tells us much about how these craft were built and operated. Bermuda sloops, however, are poorly documented. The National Maritime Museum in UK has drawings made by the Admiralty (they were that impressed by the speed and handling of the sloops) but wreckage has never been found and verified.

Bermuda Sloop under sail from an old print. Image: Hosea.blogspot.com
Bermuda Sloop under sail from an old print. Image: Hosea.blogspot.com

There MAY be a wreck of one off Turks & Caicos and Nick Hutchings of Bermuda has been planning an expedition to it for some years now. The Bermuda Sloop Foundation has built a replica from modern materials based on a painting. The North Carolina ‘mystery’ wreck has yet to be examined by an archaeologist. Terrell tells us about the discovery and attempts to identify it.

You can hear the entire program at:

http://archaeologyhour.podomatic.com/entry/2015-10-15T11_34_00-07_00

 

 

 

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North Carolina Wreck Puzzles Officials

The ‘early 18th century’ wreck recently discovered off the coast of North Carolina may not be what it appears to be. The wreck was discovered by Duke University biology researchers using Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute equipment to search for a lost instrument buoy. An early press release labeled it as early 18th century or possible Revolutionary period (a pretty wide span of time in any event). Examination of photographs from the site, beneath 6,000 feet of water on the continental shelf, tell an even more confusing story.

Partially covered octant lies beside a large ceramic jar. This would date the site the mid 18th C. (Credit: Wood Hole Oceanographic Inst.)
Partially covered octant lies beside a large ceramic jar. This would date the site the mid 18th C. (Credit: Wood Hole Oceanographic Inst.)

Bruce Terrell, chief archaeologist of NOAA’s Marine Heritage Program, told the Archaeology Hour yesterday: “We can clearly see what appears to be an octant in one photograph. Yet in other photographs we can see bottles that appear to have a form normally dated to the early decades of the 19th century. Obviously we have issues when it comes to dating the wreck.”

Terrell notes other questions raised by the evidence in the photographs. “There is very little rigging hardware to be seen. The hull structure of the vessel is gone completely but from the size of the ballast pile and the rigging hardware we can see it appears to be a very small ship; maybe 40 to 60 feet long.” This might indicate a Bermuda sloop or a small coasting schooner. Coasting vessels typically hugged the coastline and operated in shallow waters and riverine areas – this site is 180 miles out on the Blake Plateau.

The current information draws immediate comparisons with the wreck of another small coasting vessel found by sport divers in the Black River, South Carolina in 1971. This reporter spent a month working on the vessel in the 1980s and later on its reconstruction at the Georgetown Rice Museum where it is now on display. This vessel also appeared to be a small coasting schooner dated to the mid 18th century – and it also contained an octant.

Sir Isaac Newton in vented the quadrant in the 1690s, the octant appeared in the 1730s. Philadelphia inventor Thomas Godfrey and English mathematician John Hadley invented it simultaneously. The instrument enabled navigators to take sightings of both the sun and stars. It’s presence on the North Carolina wreck points to a mid-18th century or possibly earlier date for the wreck. The dating contradiction arises from bottles that appear in another photograph of the site. The shapes of the bottles appear to be typical of the very late 18th or early 19th century. “It is highly improbable that two wrecks are mixed here, “said Terrell. “This is not very likely in 6,000 feet of water.”

Ballast stone and brick (similar to the Brown's Ferry Vessel) and at left a late 18th-early 19th C bottle. (Credit: Wood Hole Oceanographic Inst.)
Ballast stone and brick (similar to the Brown’s Ferry Vessel) and at left a late 18th-early 19th C bottle. (Credit: Wood Hole Oceanographic Inst.)
Bottles have shape consistent with late 18th C date. (Credit: Wood Hole Oceanographic Inst.)
Bottles have shape consistent with late 18th C date. (Credit: Wood Hole Oceanographic Inst.)

Clearly, more information is needed from the site. It is likely that more research will be done as the site adds important new information to North Carolina’s maritime history. “I am not sure what will happen next, “ says Terrell. “The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is the Federal Agency responsible for the continental shelf and the decision on next steps will come from them. Hopefully an archaeologist will be appointed and a survey of the site will be completed.”

The archaeology hour podcast can be found at:

http://archaeologyhour.podomatic.com